Active Shooter awareness training

Active shooter situations have become all too frequent in our communities. Whether it is in the workplace, nursing home, movie theater, or shopping mall, everyone should prepare themselves for a possible confrontation. The active shooter is determined to cause maximum damage to as many individuals as possible. The incidents usually are not predictable, and come without warning.

In most cases, law enforcement arrives on scene after numerous deaths have occurred.

Whether it is a firearm, a knife, car, truck, or other weapon, the outcome is sadly the same, loss of human life.

Situational awareness is key to survival. Our ancestors learned to survive by being aware of what was going on around them. Unfortunately we seem to ignore persons and events around us. Many times that is how victims are selected. They are inattentive, occupied with gadgets, and not paying attention to the actions of others. The elderly have become targets of thugs playing “Knock Out”, strong armed robbery, or simple assaults.

In law enforcement, you learn to stay in a heightened, highly vigilant state as a self-protection mechanism. In today’s society we must all be aware of our surroundings, alert to individuals in our area, and be ready to respond to potential threats.

While many businesses and elderly care facilities may have Active Shooter classes for their managers and staff, they need to also assure those in their care are also versed in emergency planning to increase their odds of survival in critical incidents.

The Department of Homeland Security has a website with an Active Shooter Preparedness guide ( https://www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness ) that is a beginning introduction to the subject matter. For further information or instruction on this matter feel free to contact me, don@bambenekinvestigations.com or call (253) 255-6910, in the Gig Harbor area.

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW, 200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Oregon Association of Licensed Investigators
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)

Phone scam IRS calling you

I know this scam seems to resurface every year about this time. Did you just received a scam call advising you that you are the subject of an IRS criminal investigation. This scam is ramping up again this year. IRS has a publication to give you some valuable information.

Aggressive and threatening phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents remain a major threat to taxpayers, headlining the annual “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams for the 2016 filing season, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

The IRS has seen a surge of these phone scams as scam artists threaten police arrest, deportation, license revocation and other things. The IRS reminds taxpayers to guard against all sorts of con games that arise during any filing season.

“Taxpayers across the nation face a deluge of these aggressive phone scams. Don’t be fooled by callers pretending to be from the IRS in an attempt to steal your money,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “We continue to say if you are surprised to be hearing from us, then you’re not hearing from us.”

“There are many variations. The caller may threaten you with arrest or court action to trick you into making a payment,” Koskinen added. “Some schemes may say you’re entitled to a huge refund. These all add up to trouble. Some simple tips can help protect you.”

The Dirty Dozen is compiled annually by the IRS and lists a variety of common scams taxpayers may encounter any time during the year. Many of these con games peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns or hire someone to do so.

This January, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) announced they have received reports of roughly 896,000 contacts since October 2013 and have become aware of over 5,000 victims who have collectively paid over $26.5 million as a result of the scam.

“The IRS continues working to warn taxpayers about phone scams and other schemes,” Koskinen said. “We especially want to thank the law-enforcement community, tax professionals, consumer advocates, the states, other government agencies and particularly the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration for helping us in this battle against these persistent phone scams.”

Protect Yourself

Scammers make unsolicited calls claiming to be IRS officials. They demand that the victim pay a bogus tax bill. They con the victim into sending cash, usually through a prepaid debit card or wire transfer. They may also leave “urgent” callback requests through phone “robo-calls,” or via a phishing email.

Many phone scams use threats to intimidate and bully a victim into paying. They may even threaten to arrest, deport or revoke the license of their victim if they don’t get the money.

Scammers often alter caller ID numbers to make it look like the IRS or another agency is calling. The callers use IRS titles and fake badge numbers to appear legitimate. They may use the victim’s name, address and other personal information to make the call sound official.

Here are five things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a tell-tale sign of a scam.

The IRS will never:

  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

Read more…

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)

Fraud against seniors

The FBI’s Common Fraud Schemes webpage provides tips on how you can protect yourself and your family from fraud. Senior citizens especially should be aware of fraud schemes for the following reasons:

  • Senior citizens are most likely to have a “nest egg,” to own their home, and/or to have excellent credit—all of which make them attractive to con artists.
  • People who grew up in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s were generally raised to be polite and trusting. Con artists exploit these traits, knowing that it is difficult or impossible for these individuals to say “no” or just hang up the telephone.
  • Older Americans are less likely to report a fraud because they don’t know who to report it to, are too ashamed at having been scammed, or don’t know they have been scammed. Elderly victims may not report crimes, for example, because they are concerned that relatives may think the victims no longer have the mental capacity to take care of their own financial affairs.
  • When an elderly victim does report the crime, they often make poor witnesses. Con artists know the effects of age on memory, and they are counting on elderly victims not being able to supply enough detailed information to investigators. In addition, the victims’ realization that they have been swindled may take weeks—or more likely, months—after contact with the fraudster. This extended time frame makes it even more difficult to remember details from the events.
  • Senior citizens are more interested in and susceptible to products promising increased cognitive function, virility, physical conditioning, anti-cancer properties, and so on. In a country where new cures and vaccinations for old diseases have given every American hope for a long and fruitful life, it is not so unbelievable that the con artists’ products can do what they claim.

    Telemarketing Fraud for Seniors

    If you are age 60 or older—and especially if you are an older woman living alone—you may be a special target of people who sell bogus products and services by telephone. Telemarketing scams often involve offers of free prizes, low-cost vitamins and health care products, and inexpensive vacations. For more information and tips to avoid these scams please visit the Telemarketing Fraud webpage.

    Read more

FTC Efforts to combat fraud affecting older Americans

In testimony before Congress today, the Federal Trade Commission described the current trends relating to fraud affecting older Americans, and how the FTC uses law enforcement and other tools at its disposal to combat these frauds.

Testifying on behalf of the Commission before the Senate Special Committee on Aging, Lois Greisman, Associate Director of the FTC’s Division of Marketing Practices, said certain types of scams are more likely to affect older Americans, such as fraudulent prize promotion schemes. The Commission’s efforts to identify and stop illegal marketing affecting seniors has become increasingly vital as the population of older Americans is growing rapidly, the testimony states.

“To protect seniors, the Commission has implemented a multi-faceted approach that encompasses robust law enforcement, strategic policy initiatives, and vigorous consumer education and outreach,” the testimony states.

The Commission has identified several varieties of fraudulent and deceptive schemes that affect seniors, including: (1) sweepstakes, prize promotions and lotteries, (2) timeshare sales and re-sales, (3) health care products and services, (4) investments, business opportunities and work-from-home programs, (5) technical support services, and (6) charitable donations.

The Commission has filed 45 cases against 163 companies and 121 individuals responsible for billions of illegal robocalls, as well as numerous Do-Not-Call violations, many targeting older Americans, and it has brought 25 cases involving conduct that specifically targeted or disproportionately harmed older adults.

For example, the FTC has aggressively pursued the money transfer services commonly used in scams targeting older Americans. Just two weeks ago, Western Union agreed to historic settlements with the FTC and the Department of Justice. The FTC’s action alleged that despite knowing its service was used by scammers, including some who were using the so-called “grandparent” scam, Western Union failed to take reasonable steps to stop the frauds. As part of the FTC’s case, as well as a deferred prosecution agreement Western Union entered into with the Department of Justice, the company has agreed to pay $586 million to redress victims.

The Federal Trade Commission works to promote competition, and protect and educate consumers. You can learn more about consumer topics and file a consumer complaint online or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357). Like the FTC on Facebook (link is external), follow us on Twitter (link is external), read our blogs and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

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Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)

WA State Proposes Draconian Gun Ban Bills from NRA-ILA.org

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson has announced two new sweeping gun control bills, with Sen. David Frockt (D-Seattle) and Rep. Strom Peterson (D-Edmonds) as the bill’s prime sponsors.

Despite being described as “assault weapon reform,” the proposed legislation is nothing short of a ban of many common, legal firearms and “large-capacity magazines” currently possessed by millions of law-abiding Americans for self-defense, hunting, and recreational shooting.

These bills have less to do with “meaningful reforms” for public safety and reducing crime (other than the newly defined crimes of being gun owners) than they do with moving the incremental process of stigmatizing guns and eliminating firearm possession by law-abiding citizens another giant step forward in Washington State.

Both bills use the same extensive definitions of “assault weapon” and “large-capacity magazine” (LCM). “Assault weapon” would include:

a semiautomatic rifle using a detachable magazine and with one or more of the listed six features (e.g., folding or telescoping stock, thumbhole stock),
a semiautomatic handgun or a semiautomatic, centerfire, or rimfire rifle with a fixed magazine that can hold more than ten rounds,
a semiautomatic, centerfire, or rimfire rifle with overall length of less than 30 inches,
a semiautomatic handgun using a detachable magazine and with one of the listed four features, and
a shotgun with a revolving cylinder or certain semiautomatic shotguns.

The link below provides additional information and a CLICK HERE TAKE ACTION to contact your Legislators to notify them to Opposition to these bans:

https://www.nraila.org/articles/20170113/alert-wa-state-proposes-draconian-gun-ban-bills

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)

Can you hear me, phone scam makes you a victim with one word (King 5 news)

King 5 news:

A growing “can you hear me” phone scam may be the scariest scam yet because it can make you a victim if you say just one word.

“Yes.”

This is how it works, according to the Better Business Bureau.

You receive a recorded call from someone who provides an introduction and identifies the business or agency they supposedly represent. After the introduction, the recording will ask if you can hear the caller clearly. If you answer “yes” there’s a possibility that the scam artist behind the phone call has recorded you and will use your agreement to sign you up for a product or service and then demand payment. If you refuse, the caller may produce your recorded “yes” response to confirm your purchase agreement.

What to do? BBB suggests the following:

• If you receive an unsolicited robocall from an organization or business, just hang up. If you are on the Do Not Call List and a company calls out of the blue to ask questions, it’s likely a scam. Avoid responding with “yes, sure or ok.”

• If you are asked a similar question in a phone call or are asked to press a button to be placed on the Do Not Call Registry, just hang up the phone. Saying anything or pressing buttons when prompted may help the scam artists identify that you have an active phone number. Remember that no government agency will ever solicit for the Do Not Call Registry.

• Write down the phone number of those callers violating the Do Not Call Registry and file a scam report with BBB Scam Tracker and the FTC’s Do Not Call List. Remember that Pennsylvania’s wiretapping law is a “two-party consent” law, making it a crime to intercept or record a telephone call or conversation unless all parties to the conversation consent.

 

http://www.king5.com/money/consumer/can-you-hear-me-phone-scam-makes-you-a-victim-with-one-word/393891758

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)

Cops may not be able to moonlight at stadiums anymore

Secondary jobs in security for thousands of NYPD cops at places from banks to Yankee Stadium is in jeopardy as a new contract raises questions about who’s responsible if an ­officer gets sued or injured, sources said. This raises serious questions about LEO security jobs across the United States.

The contract, signed by a company when an LEO takes a secondary position, was amended to make clear that the firm is responsible for any medical coverage or legal issue that the ­officer might encounter while working such details.

The NYPD made the decision to amend the pact after a suit was filed against an off-duty cop working for a company.

 

Read more…

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)
Washington Association of Legal Investigators (WALI)

IRS Alerts Payroll and HR Professionals to Phishing Scheme Involving W-2s

The Internal Revenue Service issued an alert to payroll and human resources professionals to beware of an emerging phishing email scheme that purports to be from company executives and requests personal information on employees.

IRS has learned this scheme, part of the surge in phishing emails seen this year, has already claimed several victims as payroll and human resources offices mistakenly email payroll data including Forms W-2 that contain Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information to cybercriminals posing as company executives.

This phishing variation is known as a “spoofing” email. It will contain, for example, the actual name of the company chief executive officer. In this variation, the “CEO” sends an email to a company payroll office employee and requests a list of employees and information including SSNs.

 

Read more…

 

 

Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)
Washington Association of Legal Investigators (WALI)

Cyberstalking

A simple definition of cyberstalking would be use of electronic communications to persistently harass someone. In recent years this form of stalking has been on the rise.

Washington State RCW 9.61.250 definition of Cyberstalking-Read More…

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)
Washington Association of Legal Investigators (WALI)

Types of Stalking and some common tactics of Stalkers.

The Department of Justice (DOJ), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), has a site that identifies types of stalking, common tactics of the stalker, and the impact of stalking.   It also outlines the dangers posed by stalkers and reporting stalking to law enforcement agencies.

The DOJ NIJ site will guide you through various issues concerning stalking.

 

Read More…

 

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)
Washington Association of Legal Investigators (WALI)

What is Stalking?

Stalking refers to repeated harassing or threatening behavior by an individual, such as following a person, appearing at a person’s home or place of business, making harassing phone calls, leaving written messages or objects, or vandalizing a person’s property, according to the U.S. Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime (OVC).

Any unwanted contact between two people that directly or indirectly communicates a threat or places the victim in fear can be considered stalking, but the actual legal definition of stalking varies from state to state according to each state’s laws.

Washington State RCW 9a.46.110 defines Stalking, Read More…

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

Member:
Association of Former Customs Special Agents (AFCSA)
Federal Law Enforcement Officer’s Association (FLEOA)
Intellenet
Pacific Northwest Association of Investigators (PNAI)
Pacific Northwest License, Tax, and Fraud Association (PNLTFA)
Washington Association of Legal Investigators (WALI)

Dozens of victims lost close to $1 million, after purchasing counterfeit Louis Vuitton merchandise.

Handbags and accessories go hand-in-hand with high fashion, so it’s no wonder there is a healthy market for counterfeit goods.

Pam (last name withheld) sought a high-end bag, but a search online led to something quite different.

“I had admired a friend’s pocketbook,” she said, “and it was a Louis Vuitton and it was a specific style but was told that they discontinued it.”

So she went online and found a site that claimed all items were sent with a letter of authenticity.

“The price was pretty much on target for what would be an authentic bag,” she said. She ordered items totaling more than $1,400.

It arrived, without the certificate of authenticity.

Then, within an hour or two, she received a phone call, from New York postal inspectors who were tracking the website and items being sent to customers. They told her they had to confiscate the bag as evidence.

A representative from Louis Vuitton came in and examine all the bags. They were able to confirm items were counterfeit.

Inspectors say dozens of victims lost close to $1 million.

Three suspects pleaded guilty to attempted wire fraud and counterfeit goods charges in this case and are awaiting sentencing.

LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV)

Read more…

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com

 

Louis Vuitton sues counterfeit online sellers in China

French luxury goods firm Louis Vuitton is seeking damages from three people convicted of offering counterfeit versions of its clothing, shoes and handbags on Alibaba Group Holding Ltd’s popular Taobao shopping website, a Beijing court said.

A district court in Beijing accepted the lawsuit filed by Louis Vuitton, owned by LVMH, the world’s biggest luxury group, last Monday, according to a statement on the court’s website.

The company is taking the three defendants, two of them surnamed Liang and the other surnamed Han, to court, “asking them to stop infringing on its trademark and is seeking compensation of economic losses of 250,000 yuan ($37,900)”, according to the court statement.

 

 

Read more…

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com

A smartphone application that could expose your personal information to criminals

Gary Miliefsky was interviewed by Bret Baier about an alarming privacy breach posed by smartphone flashlight apps.

Miliefsky, who has allegedly advised two White House administrations on cybersecurity, described this problem as bigger than Ebola because 500 million people are infected and they don’t know it.

Miliefsky explained that the top 10 flashlight apps currently available at the Google Play store are all malware.

“They’re malicious, they’re spying, they’re snooping and they’re stealing,” he said, adding that that stolen information has primarily flowed into three countries: China, India and Russia.

Miliefsky added that the stolen data is used mainly for criminal purposes, but if one of those states wants information on Americans, they now have easier access.

Read More…

investorshub.advfn.com/boards/read_msg.aspx?message_id=107245480

Video…

http://insider.foxnews.com/2014/10/01/major-cybersecurity-threat-lurking-half-billion-us-smartphones

Donald A. Bambenek II
Bambenek Investigative Group
4810 Pt. Fosdick Drive NW,  200
Gig Harbor, Washington 98335-1711
(253) 255-6910
don@bambenekinvestigations.com
www.bambenekinvestigations.com